This Chalkboard Wall Planter Lets You Grow Edible Art That Looks Good AND Tastes Good

Wall Planter (Williams Sonoma)

Kick off the spring growing season with this living wall in your kitchen. Research shows that indoor plants may help brighten your mood, reduce stress and clean the air too. All you need is a sunny window.

Related:Why You Should Grow Your Own Herbs

Tuck your favorite herbs, succulents or flowers into the 10 cubbies in the Chalkboard Wall Planter and label accordingly. An added bonus—­watering is easy. Fill the irrigator on top with water and moisture trickles down slowly to keep your plants hydrated. (There’s a tray at the bottom to collect excess.) Whenever you need some, clip a few sprigs to use in a recipe or as a pretty garnish.

Photo: Chalkboard Wall Planter, 16x5x24″ ($145),williams-sonoma.com

Related:

Our Best Spring Recipes

15 Simple Ways To Clean Up Your Kitchen

TAGS: Breana Lai, M.P.H., R.D., Healthy Cooking Blog

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